Vision

I had the privelage of having a lot of teachers and I liked cq loved almost each of them. I take something with me in my lessons I take and give from every single teacher I had. There is a lot written about good teachers, but the things that *I* appreciate and try to incorporate in my classes are:

  • Let you SMILE and enjoy the class
  • Clear cues and directions because I practice often with the eyes closed
  • Interaction between the teacher and the students during the class. Without I could also watch a youtube video of Kino of Tara. And keeps the eyes open and the gaze around. It’s about *my* practice, not yours. (And how could you see the need for modifications or adjustments if you’re turned inwards?)
  • Connection between the students and teacher before and after the class. Also nice when there’s a connection between the students. “Say Hi to your neighbours“. Unfortunately often after the class everybody rolls up the mat and hurries to go out.
  • Spiritual messages and life lessons but please, not too esotheric. Gives grounding in the beginning and end, messages, intentions, themes and brings deeper level to the classes.
  • Variation in classes (otherwise I’d do bikram) and surprising sequences
  • Gives adjustments, assists (to those who want it) and modifications to make it more or less challenging or deepening the poses
  • Social media presence. If I can choose between a class of a teacher not present on social media or somebody with an appealing facebook- or instagram page I choose the last one.

Evaluation points

All this leads to a list to be used for peer review or self evaluation, which is always a good idea to grow! (As said in this article : how to maximize your potential as yogateacher). Of course it’s not only about the technical aspects, most important is that the teacher resonates with his students. See it as a guideline, not as a quality system checklist.

  • Teacher

    • Is friendly and warm
    • Is enthusiast, smiles and energetic
    • Has a good voice volume and modulation/variation and is understandable
    • Makes connection, eye contact and interacts with the students
    • Has the right amount of spirituality
    • Works with sankalpa’s/messages, intentions, themes and brings deeper level to the classes.
    • Is available before and after the class
    • Promotes connection between students
    • Resonates with his students
  • Teaching

    • Asks for medical circumstances before the class
    • Has a natural voice (doesn’t act)
    • Has the right amount of speaking
    • Uses original words / no clichés
    • Balance between demonstrating and explaining
    • Lets the students stay in the sweet spot between comfort and safety zone.
    • Announces the poses
    • Gives clear cues
    • Explains and has attention for the target (what and where should you feel), alignments and benefits of the pose
    • Warns for contra-indications of a pose
    • Asks permission for adjustments and assists
    • Gives (safe) adjustments and assists (but space to beginners/first timers)
    • Gives equal attention to everybody
    • Gives the right amount attention to individuals
    • Connects breathing with the movements
    • Proper use of bandhas and dristhi
    • Lets you smile
  • Sequence

    • Sequence is safe (proper warm up, proper use of counter poses)
    • Sequence is given with right tempo (time in the pose, between the poses and rests)
    • Sequence is original and or surprising
      • Or
    • Sequence follows tradition (ashtanga/bikram)
    • Sequence is logical
    • Adapts sequence to the (energy/technical) level of students in general
    • Gives variations to individual students (level, blessures)
    • Enough time for grounding (beginning and during the sequence) and savasana (end)

A lot of inspiration about teaching yoga can be found at the teaching section of the Yoga Lunchbox